Special custody considerations for military parents

Special custody considerations for military parents

60077058_S.jpgMaking plans to co-parent one’s child with a former partner can be difficult for anyone who has had to go through a separation or divorce. However, when military parents are involved, child custody matters can become even more complex. This Illinois-based family law blog will offer its readers some basic considerations that military parents may wish to make when working out plans to care for their children after their divorces, but as with all legal matters it is advised that readers speak with their own attorneys about how to handle their individual needs.

Child custody plans generally address where children will live (their physical custody) and who will have the power to make decisions about their welfare (their legal custody). While a military parent may be fit to have physical custody of their child, the demands of their career may interfere with their ability to parent. For example, if a service member is called to active duty they may no longer be able to care for their child.

Additionally, the need to move or relocate may complicate a parent’s ability to retain custody of their child. Depending upon the rights of the other parent, a military parent may not be able to move with their child, even if the demands of their job require it. To this end, military parents should have short-term and long-term care plans in place to accommodate their children’s needs as well as protect the parents’ rights to custodial power over their kids.

Military service is a highly respectable path for an Illinois resident to pursue. It may, however, make parenting difficult for them if they wish to retain custody of their children. Family law attorneys can be consulted by those who desire more information on this important legal topic.

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