Divorce on the decline among millennials

Divorce on the decline among millennials

44260589_s.jpgIllinois millennials may be less likely to divorce than baby boomers. Among millennials, the divorce rate has dropped significantly, but as the oldest ones approach 40, it is unclear whether the trend will continue.

The University of Maryland sociology professor who reported the lower divorce rates in his book “The Coming Divorce Decline” believes it will. He found that between 2008 and 2016, divorce rates went down 18%. For millennials who do get a divorce, the process seems to be less complicated than for older generations. They tend to have all the necessary information available electronically, and they are often financially independent from one another. That financial independence is partly due to the fact that they are often older and more established in their careers when they get married in the first place. This has also led to a rise in prenuptial agreements among millennials.

The stigma around prenuptial agreements seems to be on the decline, and there is little social stigma around divorce any longer. The prevalence of dating sites also mean that people tend to not feel as though divorce means they will be alone forever. The divorce rate peaked in 1979, and it has been on the decline ever since.

Whatever generation they are part of, people who are considering ending their marriage might want to consult an attorney. The attorney may be able to answer questions about state law and provide some insight into how property might be divided. Even if there is a prenup or finances are otherwise fairly straightforward, if there are children, other issues could become more complicated. Parents may still be able to negotiate an agreement for child custody instead of going to court. This may be cheaper than litigation and might give them the opportunity to choose a schedule that best suits them and their family.

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